El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro
Where's The Trail?
Maps, photos, and aerial photography of the trail
Primarily in Sierra & Socorro counties
GATEWAY PAGE 
To detailed maps of the trail for researchers
 
 
 
Website courtesy of the Socorro County Historical Society (SCHS), P.O. Box 921, Socorro, New Mexico 87801 [SCHS home page]

Back to
TOP
Click on the TRAIL MAP below
to jump to the trail section of your interest for detailed topo maps, GoogleEarth images, ground and aerial photos of the trail,
historic documentation, and other trail information.

NOTE: These detailed map pages are currently being built
and under constant updating.
SCHS Home
General Trail Maps
>>Socorro-History.org/CAMINOREAL/Gateway
Gateway
1
Trail Home
La Joya Region
Socorro North
Socorro South
Mesa/Valverde
Paraje Region
Laguna Region
Jornada South
Dona Ana Region
Detailed Trail Maps
Sponsored by Socorro County Historical Society
gate001007.jpg
SOCORRO SOUTH REGION
MESA DE CONTADERO/VALVERDE
JORNADA DEL MUERTO SOUTH REGION
DOŅA ANA REGION
The northern extreme of the Jornada del Muerto. The trail passed through several Piro pueblos, with the Senecú mission pueblo the southern most pueblo (until 1680).  Several popular paraje's along the river for water and grazing. Mesa del Contadero was the "counting place" – a trail landmark.
1600s – Piro pueblos along the trail including Pilabo (today's Socorro), the principal mission pueblo of the province. Many towns developed along the trail in the early 1800s, many are today's towns, others died with the trail.
The southern portion of the Jornada del Muerto. Northbound caravans would assemble at Paraje de San Diego on the Rio Grande, generally waiting for the full moon for night travel to expedite their trip through the Jornada. The San Diego crossing and paraje was considered the southern entrance to the Jornada del Muerto. Entering the Jornada, there was little reliable water for the next 90 miles. Springs at Paraje del Perrillo and Aleman provided some water, but seldom enough for the entire caravan.  Much of the Jornada del Muerto is along an open, flat basin with few landmarks.  Trail guides were essential for keeping the wagon caravans on the trail and scouting ahead for possible water, hazards, or washed out trails where an alternate path was blazed. The Jornada was one of the most dreaded sections of the trail.
Crossing the Rio Grande at El Paso, Mesilla and Doņa Ana were the last towns northbound caravans would see for many days on the trail. Old town Doņa Ana remains an authenic village today of a typical El Camino Real village.
Click for detailed maps & photos
gate001004.jpg
LA JOYA/SEVILLETA REGION
Northern portion of the Piro nation. The Tzelaqui pueblo was renamed "Sevilleta" by Oņate in 1598, which became a Franciscan mission pueblo 1620s; abandoned in 1680 Pueblo Revolt. Caravans would assemble at La Joya for the southbound journey. Sevilleta and La Joya are two well documented areas and parajes along El Camino Real in this region.
Click for detailed maps & photos
Click for detailed maps & photos
Under construction
Under construction
LAGUNA DEL MUERTO REGION
Under construction
Desert Ratts
Click for detailed maps & photos
Click for detailed maps & photos
The Camino Real Mapping Project
on these web pages
is the exclusive work of the 
 
 
members of the Socorro County
Historical Society and other
volunteers dedicated to
documenting, mapping, presenting,
and preserving the historic trail.
SOCORRO DESERT RATTS,